A brief tutorial on how to behave in a battle in a scenario battle
 

We will proceed in the form of frequently asked questions:
 

Why should I do something I don't want to do and pretend to be dead when I fight less? The answer is simple, the battle is to entertain the viewer, who pays a good spectacle while offering fun to the swordsmen and the opportunity to liven up his own hobby. However, if the viewer is not entertained, he will not come next time and it will not be possible to make another battle. The more fun the spectator enjoys, the more likely he is to come and bring acquaintances next year, and the more the organizer will be able to offer the fencers participating in the battle. The aim of the main battle is not to survive as long as possible and kill as many opponents as possible, but to enjoy the battle, the atmosphere of the atmosphere and at the same time entertain the spectators - to compete and survive are in Libušín other pastimes like HMB tournament or free battle.

Burning volley of whistles and muskets burns at me, what should I do? If you are first of all, there is a good chance that you have just been hit by a ball. Where? Choose yourself! Anything is better than nothing - it won't cost you much, grab your hand and retreat from the front row (because the wounded doesn't fall into the front row, that), or fall under the feet of your marching comrades and let someone pick you up - does not eliminate, but the atmosphere of battle will significantly enhance.

An arrow hit me, what do I do? Play injuries if you notice - due to the use of the Euro-arrows, it is possible that you have been hit many times without noticing it (it is very common), so when you notice it means that this time it did not cover your armor. Depending on where you were hit you have injuries - what does this mean? The affected place probably hurts and forces you to retreat from the fight, withdraw between comrades and if you do not fall, take a moment to breathe outside the viewer somewhere in the scrum. Then you can go back to battle. If you are hit in the vital part of your body and you do not have adequate armor there is no choice but to fall and hope someone will transport you to the hospital.

A cannon is burning at me, what do I do? Definitely not to stay calm. You are flying a ball that has the power to tear you. Crouch down, try to dodge while in tight grip, ripple rows, or fall. The basic rule is DOING SOMETHING. Will someone fall next to you? That means your friend was torn to pieces. Or maybe he still lives? Wouldn't it be good to help him? Put yourself in the role and play them the foundation.

I'm hit, hurt, I'm tired, I'm falling, now what? Few injuries kill instantly. Usually it kind of hurts before. Like a pig! So do not lie like a board, hold your injuries, move, yell. This will also provoke your comrades to come and help you to check for real injuries. And when they are there, they will either be able to pick you up and return to battle, or send you to a hospital. What is certainly wrong is to start laughing. You want your life in battle, don't laugh. And even if your comrades pick you up, remember that the wound still hurts; Keep a full recovery from injury until you are covered by the crowd.

So I can't get up myself, blow it up? Not if the viewer sees you. Of course, the exception can be set in a scenario.

Otherwise, no "but".

That is all? Almost - rule number one in all circumstances: Play, enjoy your falls, make them your little story. Scenes like the fallen lord and his subjects that keep him out of his breath, the fallen commander and the people around him trying to resurrect him, the dying friend comforted by his companion, all pushes the battle far further, making it more than a rough threshing. Rule number two is to avoid stealing from the dead that I don't know personally and for which I am not sure I will find them after the battle. Rule number three is that nothing in this list is 100% true, but 90% sure.

Give the audience the best possible experience, and they will reward you with applause and repeated visits!